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Answers
Answer from mim
2 people found this helpful

Oxford for literature


An English major needs a more precise dictionary than the usual "College" dictionary, which is fine for general use. I find I use the Chambers 20th Century Dictionary most often; it's Scottish and has basic word origins at a much handier size than the Oxford.

 

Answer from EddieNygma
1 people found this helpful

The best college dictionary is Webster's New World College Dictionary, Fourth Edition


The edition I've linked to also comes witha CD-ROM.

Book Description
THE MOST USEFUL AND AUTHORITATIVE DICTIONARY YOU CAN OWN—FOR YOUR DESK AND YOUR COMPUTER

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Definitions That Set the Standard for Clarity

Up-to-Date Entries

Nearly 7,500 new entries reflecting changes in technology, society, world politics, and more.

Detailed Illustrations

Over 850 drawings, photographs, and maps.

Extensive Reference Information

Tables, charts, and lists of useful data plus important historical documents and a guide to punctuation.

Thousands of Geographical and Biographical Entries

The people and places that shape our world. Entries are part of the A-Z body of the dictionary, so they are easy to find.

Full-Color Atlas of the World

Detailed and up-to-date maps of the continents and countries of our world.

Notes, Examples, and Synonyms

The help you need to choose words precisely and avoid usage pitfalls.

The Definitive Guide to American English

More unique Americanisms—nearly 12,000—than any other college dictionary.

THE HARDEST WORKING

ELECTRONIC DICTIONARY AND THESAURUS

Sophisticated Word Search

Search for words or combinations of words. Display definitions, synonyms, or both. Find related words quickly.

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Expanded Spell-Checking

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20 MB hard disk space (Minimal installation);

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Sources: http://www.amazon.com/Websters-College-Dictionary-Fourth-CD-ROM/dp/0764571257/sr=1-1/qid=1165907129/ref=pd_bbs_sr_1/102-0623691-0552123?ie=UTF8&s=books

 

Answer from newbie90403

I always liked the Merriam-Webster. It always seemed to have everything I needed.



 

Answer from usfcsudn
0 people found this helpful

Neither...


Go with dictionary.com

 

 

Comments on this question:

I'd strongly recommend the American Heritage dictionary instead. It has excellently-worded, clear definitions and good illustrations. For example, "bonnet" is defined as "1. a hat that is held in place by ribbons tied under the chin" AND, further down, as "5. (British) the hood of an automobile."