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Answer from awarulz
1 people found this helpful

Isn't that zork?


Zork was one of the first interactive fiction computer games and an early descendant of Colossal Cave Adventure. The first version of Zork was written in 1977–1979 on a DEC PDP-10 computer by Tim Anderson, Marc Blank, Bruce Daniels, and Dave Lebling, and implemented in the MDL programming language. All four were members of the MIT Dynamic Modelling Group.

Zork is set in a sprawling underground labyrinth which occupies a portion of the "Great Underground Empire". The player is a nameless adventurer whose goal is to find the treasures hidden in the caves and return alive with them, ultimately inheriting the title of Dungeon Master. The dungeons are stocked with many novel creatures, objects and locations, among them grues, zorkmids, and Flood Control Dam #3—all of which are referenced by subsequent Infocom text adventures.

Zork and its relatives are works of interactive fiction. Zork distinguished itself in its genre as an especially rich game, in terms of both the quality of the storytelling and the sophistication of its text parser, which was not limited to simple verb-noun commands ("hit grue"), but some prepositions and conjunctions ("hit the grue with the Elvish sword").
Sources: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Zork

 

Answer from jejeje
0 people found this helpful

Commodore 64


The Commodore 64 is an 8-bit home computer introduced by Commodore International in January, 1982. Volume production started sometime in the spring of 1982, with machines being released on to the market in August at a price of US$ 595.

[1][2] Preceded by the Commodore VIC-20 and Commodore MAX Machine, the C64 features 64 kilobytes (65 536 bytes) of memory with sound and graphics performance that were superior to IBM-compatible computers of that time. It is commonly known as the C64 or C=64 and occasionally referred to as CBM 64 (Commodore Business Machines Model number 64), or VIC-64.[3] It has also been affectionately nicknamed the "breadbox" and "bullnose" due to the shape and colour of the first version of its casing[citation needed].


During the Commodore 64's lifetime, sales totalled 17 million units, making it the best-selling single personal computer model of all time.[4] For a substantial period of time (1983-1986), the Commodore 64 dominated the market with between 30% and 40% share and 2 million units sold per year,[5] outselling the IBM PC clones, Apple computers, and Atari computers. Sam Tramiel, a former Atari president said in a 1989 interview "When I was at Commodore we were building 400 000 C64s a month for a couple of years."[6]

Part of its success was because it was sold in retail stores instead of electronics stores, and that these machines can be directly plugged into an existing home television without any modifications. Commodore produced many of its parts in-house to control supplies and cost. It is sometimes compared to the Ford Model-T for bringing a new technology to middle-class households via creative mass-production.[7]

Approximately 10 000 commercial software titles were made for the Commodore 64 including development tools, office applications, and games.[8]

The machine is also credited with popularizing the computer demo scene. The Commodore 64 is still used today by some computer hobbyists.[9] And various C64 emulators allow anyone with a modern computer, or a compatible game console, to run these programs.

Since 28 March 2008, Commodore 64 games have been available to buy through Nintendo's Virtual Console service in Europe; the first games available were Uridium and International Karate.[10][11] Later, on February 23, 2009, the Commodore 64 section was launched in North America with the first three titles, International Karate,
Sources: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Commodore_64

 

Answer from Jray38
I was looking for this on youtube or on line somewhere. We called it THE COUNT but in looking on line it appears to be the early version of Castle of Terror which was text AND graphic. The one we played was text only and you had to GO GATE, TURN RIGHT, GO PATH etc. you did get into the castle ultimately... LOOK RIGHT, LOOK DOWN..... (answer) "nothing to look at" etc. You had to GET KEY or whatever the object was.... I remember ultimately we got into a room and had to tie sheets together EXIT WINDOW etc to climb down and into the floor below where the Count ultimately was. But thats where we got stuck. Found the coffin but could not get it open. You can find the second version on Youtube with text and graphics. I wanted to show my kids what we had when they were babies.
 

 

 
Answer from Norfic
I think you are talking about Castle Maze Adventure. You start in a forest, go south to a bridge and a knight charges at you, you kill him and then "cross bridge" to get to the castle. There is a Ming Vase in one of the first rooms. A crack in the wall, a spider, a sorcerer that tries to kill you, etc...

If that is the one you seek, then you can download it from here:

http://nitroroms.com/show/file-info/70018/Commodore_64/Castle%20Maze%20Adventure%20(19xx)(The%20Guild%20Adventure%20Software).t64.html

Hope this helps.
 

 

 
Answer from Udhayasolutions
0 people found this helpful

Old Commodore 64 (C64) text based game


JaC64 and JSIDPlay are completely written in Java and can be run from a modern web browser like Firefox, InternetExplorer or Netscape Navigator. jac64.com contains information about the emulator and JSIDPlay (100% Java sid player) as well as games and demos playable directly in your browser. On jac64.com you can try it out with classical C64 games such as Arkanoid, Commando, and California games.

One goal with JaC64 and JSIDPlay is to make it possible for Commodore C64 game and demo developers as well as C64 music composers to show their old (and new) C64 games/demos/music on-line on the web. There are some demos and games as a showcase of what JaC64 can do, and the full HVSC music collection for trying out in JSIDPlay.
Sources: http://www.jac64.com/

 

Answer from aniva
0 people found this helpful

Flashback: The Commodore 64 In Pictures


The Commodore 64 is the computer that launched the careers of many of today's IT experts. Back in the 1980s, you could easily get countless add-ons, accessories, and peripherals for this home computer. For example, one of the best-beloved models in this family was the Commodore 128, whose C128D Diesel version sported a built-in 5" floppy drive. Along with an 80-column RGB monitor, a dot matrix printer, and an ungodly expensive 20 MB hard disk, you could also select from a large number of input devices and a plethora of software.

This breadbox shaped computer--also called a "bullnose" thanks to its rounded front edge--led many young enthusiasts to neglect their school work, and prompted many sleepless (but exciting) nights at the keyboard. At that time, the x86 PC was still chasing the Commodore for market share. These were pioneering days for personal computing technology and interest in the field pushed many people into IT careers. A whole slew of Tom's Hardware editors trace their computing roots back to the C64, or to other early PC precursors such as the VC20, C16, or C166 models. Generally, they moved to Amiga 500s or to the original 8086 PC models from there.
Sources: http://www.tomshardware.com/picturestory/487-commodore-64-c64.html

 

Answer from newuser63181292
0 people found this helpful

The Commodore 64 In Pictures


Zoom

The Commodore 64 is the computer that launched the careers of many of today's IT experts. Back in the 1980s, you could easily get countless add-ons, accessories, and peripherals for this home computer. For example, one of the best-beloved models in this family was the Commodore 128, whose C128D Diesel version sported a built-in 5" floppy drive. Along with an 80-column RGB monitor, a dot matrix printer, and an ungodly expensive 20 MB hard disk, you could also select from a large number of input devices and a plethora of software.

This breadbox shaped computer--also called a "bullnose" thanks to its rounded front edge--led many young enthusiasts to neglect their school work, and prompted many sleepless (but exciting) nights at the keyboard. At that time, the x86 PC was still chasing the Commodore for market share. These were pioneering days for personal computing technology and interest in the field pushed many people into IT careers. A whole slew of Tom's Hardware editors trace their computing roots back to the C64, or to other early PC precursors such as the VC20, C16, or C166 models. Generally, they moved to Amiga 500s or to the original 8086 PC models from there.

* Successors To The "Breadbox"


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BallistaMan 02/19/2009 9:19 AM
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I thoroughly enjoyed this article. 'Twas a great read for all the "newbies" like me who can't remember much beyond when CPUs were around the 100MHz range.

It's amusing that people were actually quite productive with these things. I know I could never do it. xD
Anonymous 02/19/2009 9:41 AM
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A nice blast from the past, remembering all the hours wasted doing nothing but rebooting and playing with 10 print... 20 goto 10... etc :)

neiroatopelcc 02/19/2009 9:50 AM
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Last month I found an old C64 magazine dated februar 1989 in a pile of stuff at home, and I started browsing some of it. It's funny to see that nothing much has really changed since then - except for speed.
The cdrom drive has existed since 86, and since 87 or 88 you could get an adapter for your c64 so you could use an audio cd to load software the same way you use your tape ... also I was surprised that a 30mb seagate harddrive only cost 500DM - I would've expected more considering I hadn't even heard of a harddrive at the time. And 30mb was afterall massive compared to the storage on a 5,25" floppy.

Nice lookback to the old stuff though :)
Sources: http://www.tomshardware.com/picturestory/487-commodore-64-c64.html